Jan 14, 2020

ALEXIS, PLEASE CLEAN THE APARTMENT


I can't seem to get out of the Happy Chair today, Dearies.  It's 2:00 in the afternoon, and I am still sitting here in my pj's enjoying the Christmas lights (pause for judgement) and contemplating another cup of damn good.

Energy and motivation have escaped me, it seems, so I am wondering if it would be so wrong to just have a quiet lazy Tuesday with some stitching and coloring and some Flosstube watching on the TeeVee.

I do, however, have a question for any of you Yankee candle devotees out there:  Have you had a soot problem, and if so, is there a solution for it? I recently discovered that the walls and corners of CS2 are blackened with soot that I am sure is the result of me burning candles. It's bad enough that I am going to have to figure out how to clean and re-paint before moving out, but I also have quite a few candles that I would like to continue to enjoy. I always trim the wicks and rotate so that they burn evenly, but is there something else I can do? I'm burning the large tumbler candles with two wicks, but should I switch to something different?

You all always give me such good advice that I figured somebody in the family would know what to do. If you are kind enough to reply...thank you in advance.

Well, I suppose my lazy day isn't going to start itself, so I better get on with it. I hope your very own Tuesday is perfectly swell and that you will come tell me all about it!

26 comments:

  1. Coni,

    According to Yankee Candle:
    "Keep wick trimmed to 1/8 inch at all times. The wick should be trimmed every 4 hours of burn time. Simply extinguish the flame, let the candle come to room temperature, and trim the wick to 1/8 of inch before relighting. Our Wick Trimmers make this task easy and creates a nice clean cut that properly maintains the wick.

    Place the bottom of the trimmer flush with the surface of the candle.

    Rock the trimmer back so that the “elbow” now rests on the surface of the candle.

    Ensure that your trimmer is at a 45-degree angle to ensure the proper wick length. This will prevent the wick from being cut too short or causing the candle to burn improperly.

    Bring the two handles together to trim the wick. Discard the remnant wick before lighting.

    To keep wick at 1/8” at all times, it is suggested to trim the wick every four hours of burn time.

    Keeping the wick trimmed to 1/8 of an inch at all times helps control the amount of “fuel” or wax that is present. By keeping the amount of fuel limited, the flame will create ideal complete combustion where carbon particles are absorbed by the flame. This means less soot is formed while the candle is burning. The formation of soot has nothing to do with the type of wax (soy, paraffin, vegetable, or other) as all burning items create soot as a product of incomplete combustion. It all has to do with the quality of the wick and the proper care of the candle"

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  2. I've always heard that beeswax and soy candles don't soot like regular candles. The comment by Liz sounds so scientific that I'm sure it's true.....but I'll just stick with beeswax and soy. Patty McDonald

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  3. I've gone to Soy candles! Thereare plenty out there including great finds at Homegoods, TJ Max, Marshalls. Over the years I think Yankee Candles has lost the bubble. I had the same problem with soot until I made the switch!

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  4. If your candle isn't close to a wall, I'm very surprised that soot is a problem. Like it says above, the soy and beeswax candles will also give off soot. But I have to say that I like the way soy candles burn. Maybe you aren't trimming the wick close enough. I thought 1/4" was the recommended trimming length, but I see that Yankee Candle advises to use 1/8" trim.

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  5. I don't know if they still sell it but Yankee used to sell pewter candle toppers to prevent the soot problem

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  6. I just looked it up and it is called an Illuma lid

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  7. I do not blow my candles out I just put the lid on, I have never had a soot problem even with the cheaper candles, the lid catches all the soot

    Catherine

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    Replies
    1. I'm thinking this is a thing. I put the lid on my Yankee Candle to extinguish the flame. No soot on the ceiling. I even got a flashlight out to check for soot and the ceiling is pristine. ymmv

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  8. Stay in your happy chair if you need to! I'm more concerned about the candles. Soot on the walls means soot in your lungs as well, and if the candles are producing visible soot they are also producing the less visible but more damaging micro particles that can penetrate deep into your lungs and enter the bloodstream. I wouldn't burn candles, incense or anything else in the house! Elaine in Melbourne, Australia

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  9. I have a lot of real candles but don't like the idea of a live flame in my living room. As a result, I purchased a bunch of tiny, battery operated, flickering tea lights from Amazon and put them into my real candles. I carved out a little space and one fits right in. Turn on the battery and you have a really neato flickering candle without a live flame. However, you don't get the candle's scent this way. But you don't end up breathing soot either.

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  10. No suggestions on the soot/candle issue! Since smoke/fragrance is an issue in this household, we don't burn candles or incense.

    I think you should have a lazy day especially since tomorrow is chair time. And I like the lights on your trees by the TeeVee so no judgement from me!

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  11. I was an insurance adjuster for many years. People would file claims, saying their HVAC systems were defective due to accumulations of soot such as you mention. It was due to burning candles on a frequent basis. I limit my candle use (of any kind) to special occasions and use the LED candles if I want ‘atmosphere’ otherwise.

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  12. Huh! I don't burn candles very often but I have never noticed soot and I have trimmed a wick. That being said I am not the best housekeeper so it is quite possible I just don't notice the soot. Who knows. Hope you are able to figure out a way to keep burning your candles.

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  13. Yes I’ve had a soot problem accumulating on the filter of my clap. Once I realized what was causing this I quit burning but now use a candle warmer to melt the candle and produce the scent. Much better.

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  15. I burn smaller jar candles with one wick and have never had any soot. I like the occasional candle scent, I buy primitive styles. I hope you don't have to wash your walls, that would be awful.

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  16. My sister found along with trimming the wicks, using one of those decorative,sort of open work,filigree type metal candle jar covers helped prevent soot on walls. They are supposed to help the candle burn cleaner.

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  17. PS: this blog post talks about this very problem and specifically Yankee candles
    http://andyyankeecandles.blogspot.com/2015/04/how-to-stop-soot-getting-on-your-walls.html

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  18. Ooh lots of interesting comments. I stopped getting Yankee. I have tried soy, but ended up wheezing every time one was lit, which is a shame because the scent was super. Actually we don't burn candles much here at all now.
    As for the fairy lights - I may have taken down the decorations, but as hubby was away last night, I left some fairy lights on the stairs and slept with the bedroom door open. Such a little comfort to see their glow. I think I might save them from being packed away in case he's off again - he's planning a holiday to stay with his cousin in South Africa, yup, keeping the lights out!

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  19. Thanks to the commenters for the candle info, especially the candle covers. I do a mix of wax warmer & candles, and put the lid on after blowing them out. I think I need to improve my wick trimming habits, get a cover, and just put the lid on to extinguish though.

    One thing I read recently about candles, but didn't see mentioned, is that when trimming the wick, do not leave the burnt trimmings in the wax. I think it adds to soot problems, besides looking bad.

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  20. everyone needs a lazy, pajama day to recharge--led candles are a great option--looks pretty and no soot or residue

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  21. The covers, called followers, seem to avoid soot and control
    the candle's melting pattern. They come in crystal, and other finishes...ours are brass.A plane flying over will never notice the soot on the walls...knowing our fastidious Coni, it is probably not even discernable to 85% of the population. Color, stitch and menu plan...to your heart's
    content.

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  22. I have had the same problem! We will be repainting together. Love yankee, have been burning them for years, and have done everything mentioned to prevent sooting(including using their decorative burn lids). Nothing works to prevent. Soap and water will remove, but you will need to do the entire wall or ceiling. (Been there, done that) still burning yankee. They are rather like pets...worth the mess!

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  24. Late to the party as always but those candles have been bugging me awhile now so here goes. Any candles other than 100% beeswax with no fragrance are proven to be as harmful as second hand smoke. So there's another reason to quit the Yankee Candles. Beeswax candles are super easy to find on Etsy, I particularly like ZaxBeesWax. He is a former police officer and some proceeds go to first responders. Good luck!

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